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Kurupi – yerba mate brand and demonic legend

2024-03-18
Kurupi – yerba mate brand and demonic legend

Small, ugly and hairy. He runs around the jungle, hides in the bushes, and is dressed only in a hip-band… made from his unnaturally long privates, wrapped several times around his belly! Kurupi is not only one of the most interesting and best yerba mate for true connoisseurs. It is also a character from Guarani mythology. We have to admit that the Indians were imaginative. They came up with an extraordinary creature. Meet Kurupi!

Summary:

  1. Who is Kurupi? Guarani Indian mythology
  2. Yerba mate, and Kurpi?
  3. Kurupi – the quintessential Paraguayan tradition
  4. Kurupi yerba mate and customer reviews

Who is Kurupi? Indian legends and stories

Kurupi is a character from the legends of the Guarani Indians. One of the seven monstrous children of a pair of evil deities, Taú and Kerana. He is also known by the name Curupi. Kuru'pir in the Indian language literally means rough or pimple-covered skin. It is a reference to the demon's appearance. He is small, ugly and hairy. He has flushed cheeks and a very dark complexion, black eyes with no pupils, pointed teeth and ears, and long, dishevelled hair. He also has a thick belly and moves clumsily. Kurupi lives in the jungle, where he looks after wild animals. His defining feature is unnaturally long privates, which he wraps several times around his hips. Initially, the Guarani Indians considered Kurupi to be the protector of the forest, the guardian of the fauna and flora. Because of his distinctive and rather peculiar feature, he was also considered the patron of fertility. In some versions of the legend, Kurupi is combined with other mythological figures who were also tasked with defending the jungle – Pombero, with hairy hands and feet, and Curupira, with fiery red hair and feet turned backwards, so he could confuse hunters by leaving upturned footprints in his wake.

Over time, the legend of Kurupi evolved and he began to be blamed for unexpected and unwanted pregnancies. Its fearsome vitals was believed to have the ability to grasp, open or pass through half-open doors, windows and other entrances. Because of this Kurupi was believed to conceive a child with a sleeping woman without even entering the dwelling. The legend of the forest creature has sometimes been used for unholy purposes. Young Indian women getting pregnant by another man in fear of the wrath of their husband and his environment used the legendary figure as a scapegoat. When the perpetrator of a rape was unknown in a small community, the blame also mysteriously fell on Kurupi. The creature's children were supposed to resemble their father – they were to be small, ugly and hairy. Male descendants were supposed to inherit his sexual insatiability. In some cases, Kurupi was even blamed for kidnapping young women. The creature would kidnap them from their homes and take them to the jungle. There, along with the “loot”, he would give vent to his wild lusts.

With general progress and an increasingly educated population, the Kurupi story slowly ceased to explain unplanned or surprise pregnancies and rapes without a perpetrator. Nowadays it is just a curiosity, a myth. In a slightly funny and a bit scary way, it is meant to warn young women against too much promiscuity. And also of the dangers lurking ahead. To date, figurines depicting the mythical monster can be found in South America from time to time. It looks different, but its carnal attribute is always depicted.

Yerba mate Kurupi

Yerba mate, and Kurpi?

And what does Kurupi have in common with yerba mate? Did the demon of the forest and fertility drink mate tea? We know nothing about this. Ilex paraguariensis was supposed to be a gift of the good deities to the Guarani Indians. Kurupi, as a monstrous child of evil spirits, might have feared this wonderful gift – a symbol of friendship. But who knows him there? Maybe at this very moment Kurupi is hiding somewhere in the jungle and sipping the wonderful brew? Maybe it is the yerba mate that spurs him to be so active? Why was a brand of one of Paraguay's finest yerba mate named after a fearsome demon of ill repute? Perhaps it was precisely for the temperament, power and expressiveness of the terrible Indian story, which corresponds to the intense and stimulating, typically Paraguayan yerba mate, produced in the spirit of a tradition cultivated for centuries. The manufacturer is silent on its website, giving very perfunctory information about the brand it is creating. All that remains, therefore, is speculation.

Kurupi – the quintessential Paraguayan tradition

Is it the character of a mischievous, peculiar creature behind the success of Kurupi yerba mate? Or is it the excellent quality of the product, the wonderful compositions with herbal additives and the dedication to Paraguayan tradition? We put our money on the second option. The Kurupi brand is the creation of the Paraguayan company Santa Margarita, which was founded in 1985 by a couple – Oscar Esteban Benitez Rapetti, known as Don Coco, and his wife Martha. Both were pharmacists. In addition to this, Oscar was involved in industrial chemistry and Martha in biochemistry. Even earlier, before the company that brought them fame in the yerba mate world, Oscar was involved in the production of herbal blends and natural herbal-based medicines in the pharmacy he ran. A little later, Don Coco and Martha created the Té Guarani brand of herbal express teas, and then set up their own herb and tea plantation. In 1990, the plantation expanded to include yerba mate – a plant that particularly interested Don Coco because of its valuable properties and high caffeine, vitamin and mineral content. The premise of the newly established Kurupi brand was, and still is, a particular concern for the natural environment and the development of the local community. Yerba mate is produced according to a traditional recipe developed by the Guarani Indians. The holly is dried using fire and smoke, giving it strong, intense, bitter and smoky accents in taste and aroma. High quality of the brand is evidenced by the numerous “Top of Mind Paraguay” awards – received in the ranking of the most recognisable brands.

Kurupi yerba mate and customer reviews

Kurupi yerba mate is beloved by fans of holly infusions, especially lovers of the Paraguayan variety – expressive, strong, giving a big kick of energy and flavour. This is evidenced not only by the feedback that customers leave in our shop, but also by the many comments from mate drinkers on social media. At one time, Kurupi was hailed as the best yerba mate in the world – certainly one of the top most appreciated brands! Be warned, however, that it is not for everyone. Its distinctive character may alienate novice mateists unaccustomed to strong flavour and stimulation. The brand's range includes not only pure classics, without any additives, such as Kurupi Clásica and Kurupi Tradicional. As befits a manufacturer with a passion for herbs, the Kurupi brand also offers original, perfectly composed herbal blends, such as the aniseed-based Kurupi Anis, the mint and lemon Kurupi Compuesta Menta y Limon, the boldo-infused Kurupi Menta Boldo, the naturally aphrodisiac-enriched Kurupi Katuava or the functional Kurupi Fitness variation. Especially popular in our shop are Kurupi Katuava and Kurupi Menta Boldo, which we recommend you try!

Girls, beware of Kurupi! However, you can try Kurupi yerba mate without fear!


Source of information:

  1. santamargarita.com.py
  2. Wikipedia: Kurupi, Pombero, Curupira
  3. La Leyenda del Curupí, regionlitoral.net

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